Blogs that Help Promote Writers


So true, really helpful 🙂

Publicity Tip #83~

Depending on how long you’ve been in the book/author publicity game you will either have a good sized list of helpful publicity sites (that don’t cost an arm and a leg) or a very small one. Regardless of the length of your current list one of the best blogs I’ve discovered online that helps promote writers is The Story Reading Ape (Chris).

What’s so special about this book/author blog?

1stoff, the publicity there is FREE.

2nd, Chris has a wide following of readers and authors (7300 at the moment) for his blog as well as on his extended social media sites – so whatever you submit for consideration will be seen.

3rd, Chris encourages quality guest posts & submissions (Author Articles & Book Promotions:Free, Discounted, New, or Debut – see requirements first).

4th, if you follow Chris you will learn about other…

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Printer’s Devil Court by Susan Hill – Review


Firstly, this book isn’t a novel; I’m not really sure you could even call it a novella; it’s more like an extended short story, which is fine. I’m a pretty slow reader but I read this in a couple of hours. Printer’s Devil Court is home to four medical students. One night when they are gathered around the fire talking the conversation takes a sinister turn. The narrator, Hugh, soon finds himself being drawn into some dark goings on in dark corners of basements and disused mortuaries. Continue reading

John Silence – Book Review


Today I’d like to introduce you to John Silence Psychic investigator the creation of Algernon Blackwood. It’s almost impossible in describing John Silence to avoid allusions to Sherlock Holmes but he is something of a psychic Sherlock. He uses reason and logic and combines them with his psychic training to help people suffering from psychic afflictions. In the sense that he is curing maladies rather than solving crimes he might be better compared to Joseph Sheridan Le Fanu’s lesser known Dr Martin  Hesselius whose cases feature in the collection’ In A Glass Darkly’ . Continue reading

10 Rare But Useful Words Everyone Should Know


Interesting Literature

Is there a word for that? Here are ten of the best useful rare words in the English language

Ever caught yourself thinking, ‘There should be a word for that. Is there a word for that?’ We’re here to help. In this new post, we’ve gathered up ten useful words which should be better known, but aren’t. Many of them, of course, have literary origins or histories, which we’ll mention and discuss as we go.

UHTCEARE: This highly useful word means ‘lying awake before dawn worrying’. It appears in the Anglo-Saxon poem ‘The Wife’s Lament’, and has recently become more widely known thanks to Mark Forsyth, who includes it in his book The Horologicon.

QUAKE-BUTTOCK: This is another term for a coward, and appears in the plays of seventeenth-century playwrights Beaumont and Fletcher. We reckon it should be revived.

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When reviews really matter…


A good reminder to all of us. I really must get around to writing some Amazon and Goodreads reviews. I know how disheartening it is to have no reviews.

Sue Vincent's Daily Echo

 “Bilbo Baggins was a Hobbit who lived in his Hobbit hole and never went for adventures, at last Gandalf the wizard and his Dwarves persuaded him to go. He had a very exiting (sic) time fighting goblins and wargs. At last they get to the lonely mountain; Smaug, the dragon who guards it is killed and after a terrific battle with the goblins he returned home — rich! This book, with the help of maps, does not need any illustrations it is good and should appeal to all children between the ages of 5 and 9.” Rayner Unwin’s review of The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien

In 1936 a ten year old boy was given a book by his father. This was not just any book, nor just any boy… Rayner Unwin was the son of Sir Stanley Unwin, founder of the publishing firm George Allen & Unwin. The…

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